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Archive for the ‘Windows’ Category

Overview of Microsoft’s Windows Azure

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Sharing CentOS Files with Remote Windows Systems- …

Although Linux is increasingly making inroads into the desktop market, its origins are very much server based. It is not surprising therefore that Linux has the ability to act as a file server. It is also extremely common for Linux and Windows systems to be used side by side both in home and business environments.

It is a common requirement, therefore, that files on a Linux system be accessible to both Linux, UNIX and Windows based systems over network connections. Similarly, shared folders residing on Windows systems must also be accessible from CentOS systems.

Windows systems share resources such as file systems and printers using a protocol called Server Message Block(SMB). In order for a Linux system to serve such resources over a network to a Windows system and vice versa it must, therefore, support SMB. This is achieved using Linux based technology called Samba. In addition to providing integration between Linux and Windows systems, Samba may also be used to provide folder sharing between Linux systems.

In this tutorial we will look at the steps necessary to share file system resources and printers on a CentOS system with remote Windows and Linux systems.

Read the tutorial here

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AWS EBS-Backed Instance Backup &Restore

Starting with the 2009-10-31 API, Amazon Web Services (AWS) has a new type of Amazon Machine Image(AMI) that stores its root device as an Amazon Elastic Block Store(EBS) volume. They refer to these AMIs as Amazon EBS-backed. When an instance of this type of AMI launches, an Amazon EBS volume is created from the associated snapshot, and that volume becomes the root device. You can create an AMI that uses an Amazon EBS volume as its root device with Windows or Linux/UNIX operating systems.These instances can be easily backed-up. You can modify the original instance to suit your particular needs and then save it as an EBS-backed AMI. Hence, if in future you need the the modified version of instance, you can simply launch multiple new instances from the backed-up AMI and are ready to-go.

Following are the steps to be performed for backup/restoring of AWS EBS instance into/from an AWS AMI. Also brief steps for deletion of AMI backup are noted for reference.
 

EBS-instance to EBS-backed AMI

  • Go to AWS Management Console and in the My Instances Pane, select the instance which has to be backed up.
  • Right click the instance and select option Create Image (EBS AMI).
  • In the Create Image dialog box, give proper AMI Name and Description. Click on Create This Image button.
  • The image creation will be in progress. This will take sometime depending upon the number & size of volumes attached to the instance. Click on View pending image link. It will take you to the AMIs pane.
  • The AMI will be in pending state. It is important to note that this AMI is private to the account and not available for AWS public use.
  • If you select Snapshots from the Navigation Pane, then you can see that EBS volumes attached to the instance will be backed up as too.
  • Once the backup is done, the AMI will be in available state.

 

Restore from backup AMI into instance

In case, the running instance needs to be restored, use the latest backup AMI. To launch an instance from this AMI, right-click the AMI and select Launch Instance option. The Launch Instance Wizard will be displayed, perform the usual configurations and a new instance will be created containing all the data & configurations done before backup.

 

Delete AMI & Snapshots:

  • To delete any AMI, Right-click it and select De-register AMI.
  • Remember, deleting AMI doesn’t delete the EBS volume snapshots. Click on Snapshots from Navigation pane, search & select the snapshot(s) to be deleted. Right-click on the snapshot(s) and select delete snapshot option.
 

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